Samsung Galaxy S5

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Physically, the device isn’t all that different from its older sibling, the Galaxy S4. Both phones sport a 1080p, Super AMOLED display, and at 5.1 inches, the S5 is just a hair larger than the S4. Likewise, the phone’s face is practically identical, though the backside of the phone is where the most notable difference lies. Gone is the glossy plastic backing that made the S4 a little more slippery than one wants a smartphone to be. In its place is a textured soft-touch finish, available is four different colors (black, white, gold, and blue). The new and improved casing makes the S5 more comfortable in hand than its predecessor and less likely to go slipping and sliding all over the place. It’s also worth noting that the S5’s finish sports a significantly more premium feel than the weird faux leather of the Note line, though despite Samsung’s relentless use of the term, I would hardly call it “glam.”
Samsung isn’t a company known for its innovative leaps with its annual updates to its existing line of smartphones, and that doesn’t really change here. The S5 runs Android 4.4.2 KitKat, with Samsung’s signature tweaks to the user interface. The preinstalled apps are largely familiar; S Voice, S Health, and a slew of other S-branded applications are present, including the tiled My Magazine news reader, which is now more easily accessed from the home screen. The menu screen is a bit more streamlined than the S4, with a continuously scrolling design. The added stamina from the 2,800mAh battery, and the 2.5GHz quad-core processor provide for a fast, responsive experience that’ll last roughly twenty percent longer than the S4.

If you watched the live stream of Samsung’s event from Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, you probably heard various speakers mention the device’s heart rate monitor (several times, just in case we were in danger of forgetting), visible on the back of the phone. The company is betting on its fitness-related apps and features to be a selling point for a health-conscious consumer base, and the S5 boasts the first heart rate sensor in a smartphone, according to Samsung. On a few test runs with the heart rate monitor, I got a wider range of numbers than I expected, so the sensor is either very sensitive to slight changes or a touch finicky, though it did provide a speedy reading. Another feature of note is the Coach app, which provides real time health and fitness tracking and advice. So, if you’re on the market for a phone that’ll offer helpful critiques about your weight and stress level, the S5 might be worth checking out.

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Like Apple and HTC did with the iPhone 5S and One Max respectively, Samsung has added a fingerprint scanner to the S5, integrated into the device’s home button. You can use it to unlock your phone — Samsung promises the utmost security with the new feature — and to access Private Mode, where you can store information you don’t want anyone else to be able to see, like compromising selfies or scans of your passport. The fingerprint scanner is also designed to work with mobile payments, though its practical use is a bit hampered by the design. Unlike the iPhone’s scanner, which works with a simple touch and hold, the S5’s requires a swipe down over the home button, which must be absolutely, positively, perfectly vertical and at the speed at which the scan was originally recorded. Though you can store a number of fingerprints on the device, it was exceptionally difficult to use, especially when holding the phone with a single hand.
The Galaxy S5 comes with a 16 megapixel sensor and 4K video capabilities. The revamped interface is simpler and easier to use this time around, and the phone’s auto-focus was incredibly fast – just a quick tap on the screen and boom, you’re focused. The company claims that the 0.3 seconds it takes for the S5’s camera to focus is the speediest AF on the market, and I would be hard-pressed to argue with that as it was certainly the fastest I’ve ever used. Additionally, the improved HDR processing will be a boon to smartphone photographers working in less than ideal lighting situations.

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SmartClock Samsung Galaxy Gear

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The Galaxy Gear will only support Android 4.3 and up, leaving you with only the Galaxy Note 3 and Note 10.1 at launch. Samsung did announce that the Android 4.3 update for the Galaxy S III and Galaxy S 4 would be arriving in October, so soon there will be three supported devices for the Gear. The reason behind this requirement is likely because Android 4.3 adds native support for Bluetooth LE (low-energy), and if you’re still rocking a Galaxy S II, it’s time for an upgrade.

Samsung has a pretty decent track record when it comes to updating its devices in a (somewhat) timely manner, so when its four most popular devices (GS3, GS4, Note 2, and Note 3) are up and running with Android 4.3, the majority of the qualms customers have may be taken care of.

Camera Samsung Galaxy NX

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The Galaxy NX is Samsung’s first interchangeable lens camera that runs Android, and includes powerful hardware like 1.6GHz quad-core processor, 4.8-inch HD screen, 2GB of RAM, LTE connectivity support (Korea only), Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, GPS, microSD card slot and a 4,360mAh battery. Moreover, it has a 20.3 megapixel APS-C CMOS sensor support, ISO sensitivity up to 25,600, 8.6fps continuous shooting, full HD 1080p video capture, 2D/3D lens support, i-Function lensSMART modes, RAW image support, HDMI 1.4a and full HD video recording.

Invoxia Audioffice

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When I last wrote about Invoxia’s AudiOffice, I had one complaint… its lack of Lightning support for modern iOS devices. Fortunately, its new device fixes this. I actually had another minor complaint—its name, which led me to joke that it was an accessory for Audi automobiles! In the latest version, the mixed-case name is gone, now simply called Audioffice ($299).

The newer Audioffice is an elegant accessory, with a companion app, invoxia (free) that turns your iPhone, iPad, or Android device into a full function conference room speakerphone. You also can use internal and alternative apps like FaceTime, Skype, etc.

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iShower te ajuta sa asculti muzica preferata la dus :)

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Having quality audio anywhere you go can enhance just about any situation – and Bluetooth® speakers can make that happen. Unfortunately a majority of these speakers aren’t inexpensive, so using them in any condition whatseover – especially where water is involved – can be very risky.

Leef Bridge dual USB, USB 2.0 si micro USB

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Or in other words, you can swap the Bridge from your computer to phone (or tablet) without the need for any additional cables. The Bridge is available in a 16GB or 32GB storage option and is priced at $17.99 or $28.99 respectively. While all this sounds interesting enough so far, there is one catch that comes with the supported devices — for now this will be limited to those running Jelly Bean.

Aside from Jelly Bean, there is a device compatibility list because unfortunately not all Jelly Bean devices are supported. The Bridge also needs devices with support for a micro USB On-The-Go (OTG) connector. The list includes a variety of Samsung, HTC, Motorola and LG smartphones as well as Samsung, Lenovo and Asus tablets. Also worth noting, the Leef Bridge drive does support the Samsung Galaxy Camera.
At present the Leef Bridge is available by way of the Leef website. Finally, while storage is limited to 16GB or 32GB at the moment, Leef has said a 64GB model will be available relatively soon. Pricing for the 64GB Bridge has yet to be announced, however the drive is expected to arrive in July.

Samsung Hybrid ATIV Q Windows 8 si Android OS

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Back in May, Samsung announced the company was planing on bringing a notebook display to market with a resolution even greater than Apple’s Retina devices. Today, Samsung has officially announced the first application of the panel, used in the new ATIV Q. Boasting a 3200 x 1800 qHD+ display, the hybrid is capable of running both Android and Windows 8.

SteelSeries wireless remote pentru smartphone

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EDITOR RATING
Pros
Makes gaming on touch-screen devices much easier. Controls are similar to that of a PlayStation controller, so it’s easy to pick up and learn. Wireless.

Cons
Pricey. You can’t use the controller for full navigation; touch-screen menu selection is required for some games. Not compatible with all games. Button remapping requires a computer.

Bottom Line
The SteelSeries Free Mobile Wireless Controller aims to improve your touch-screen gaming experience, but it comes with some limitations and a too-high price.

The SteelSeries Free Mobile Wireless Controller ($79.99 direct) is a Bluetooth-enabled, multi-platform gamepad that is compatible with Android and iOS tablets and phones, PCs, and Macs. It aims to make touch-screen gaming less frustrating and easier to control.

Charge Card pentru Iphone 4, Iphone 4s, Iphone 5 si orice smartphone

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The infamous charge cord is one of the most difficult form factors in tech. It seems to always conveniently get lost, only to end up tangled and frayed at the bottom of your backpack, briefcase or junk drawer. It’s a necessary annoyance, but it’s rarely available when you need it most and easy to forget about.

Gizmodo reports that the ChargeCard, a Kickstarter-backed project made in California, offers an intriguing prospect: a 0.1″ thick charger that fits any standard USB connector on one end and attaches to your iPhone 4, iPhone 5 or Android smartphone on the other. Once your device is sufficiently charged, the adapter folds up neatly to fit a wallet’s standard credit card holder.