Invoxia Audioffice

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When I last wrote about Invoxia’s AudiOffice, I had one complaint… its lack of Lightning support for modern iOS devices. Fortunately, its new device fixes this. I actually had another minor complaint—its name, which led me to joke that it was an accessory for Audi automobiles! In the latest version, the mixed-case name is gone, now simply called Audioffice ($299).

The newer Audioffice is an elegant accessory, with a companion app, invoxia (free) that turns your iPhone, iPad, or Android device into a full function conference room speakerphone. You also can use internal and alternative apps like FaceTime, Skype, etc.

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iShower te ajuta sa asculti muzica preferata la dus :)

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Having quality audio anywhere you go can enhance just about any situation – and Bluetooth® speakers can make that happen. Unfortunately a majority of these speakers aren’t inexpensive, so using them in any condition whatseover – especially where water is involved – can be very risky.

SteelSeries wireless remote pentru smartphone

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EDITOR RATING
Pros
Makes gaming on touch-screen devices much easier. Controls are similar to that of a PlayStation controller, so it’s easy to pick up and learn. Wireless.

Cons
Pricey. You can’t use the controller for full navigation; touch-screen menu selection is required for some games. Not compatible with all games. Button remapping requires a computer.

Bottom Line
The SteelSeries Free Mobile Wireless Controller aims to improve your touch-screen gaming experience, but it comes with some limitations and a too-high price.

The SteelSeries Free Mobile Wireless Controller ($79.99 direct) is a Bluetooth-enabled, multi-platform gamepad that is compatible with Android and iOS tablets and phones, PCs, and Macs. It aims to make touch-screen gaming less frustrating and easier to control.

Mukulabs aduce o lentila cu zoom de 20x pt smartphone

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Mukulus wants to offer all sorts of zoom lenses for your smartphones as early as the summer. You may be aware of such similar devices like the reflex and system cameras. We tried out the prototypes and were super impressed. Take a look!

Fujitsu Smartphone

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Fujitsu is known for many things outside its native Japan, but not for its smartphones. To a small degree, this is now about to change – in June, the company will launch an Android device for senior citizens, the Stylistic S01, on the Orange network in France. The device fits into a longstanding range that, in Japan, is named Raku-Raku.

The S01 runs Android “Ice Cream Sandwich” 4.0 in a near-unrecognizable form, featuring a simplified layout with very large onscreen buttons. But it also has other features tailored to its target audience, such as what Orange describes as “a unique screen technology” that essentially forces users to press icons harder in order to make them work – the idea here is to help those who aren’t used to touchscreens to avoid accidentally launching things they don’t intend to launch.

The handset also adjusts the frequency range of its audio depending on the user’s age, and even slows down the speech of fast-talking callers. A personal security alarm is also included.

“As Fujitsu’s first extensive entry into the smartphone market outside Japan, we are delighted that Orange — a company that holds a strong position in the European market — will be offering our phone, which features Fujitsu-exclusive human-centric technologies,” Fujitsu corporate SVP Nobuo Otani said in a statement. “We are committed to the success of this partnership as we strive to expand our smartphone business overseas, while advancing the promotion of Japanese technology worldwide.”

This shouldn’t be so unusual

It’s worth noting that Fujitsu is not the only mobile phone maker to target senior citizens: Sweden’s Doro has built an entire business around that market, although its handsets are much simpler. Doro also has an application pack for making Android tablets more senior-friendly, and a similar approach has been taken in the smartphone realm by carriers such as Sprint.

In some ways, the application pack idea could serve as a transitional solution for senior citizens who find the standard smartphone interface a bit difficult to handle. If Microsoft’s Windows Phone styling becomes an influencer and UI designs become more generally big-button, there will be less of a need for such things in the future.

But more fundamental technological solutions, such as those Fujitsu is displaying in the Raku-Raku/Stylistic range, will always find an audience. And let’s face it, with an ageing population in much of the developed world, there’s a growing market to address here. Looking at things that way, it’s actually quite surprising how few players are focusing on the accessibility angle today.